Historical

Around the Moroccan World in 80 Days

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Jordan Erb is a student at Boise State University and an ISA Featured Blogger. She is currently studying abroad with ISA in Meknes, Morocco

Over the past 80-ish days, my peers and I have been on a whirlwind tour of one of the most beautiful and diverse countries I have ever seen. From Mediterranean beaches to picturesque mosques and palaces to ocean side caves and winding medinas, Morocco has something for every traveler. Whether it be cultural immersion, a weekend escape, getting in touch with nature or simply being as touristy as humanly possible, all of my jet setting dreams have come true here in Morocco. Here are a few of my top destinations so far:

#1 Al Hoceima:

This Mediterranean gem has a special place in my heart. Located at the northernmost tip of Morocco, the tiny beach town has the most immaculate coastline that I have ever experienced. The water is clear enough to see for tens of feet below you and the beaches are enclosed by beautiful rocky cliffs. Renting a kayak for a couple of hours proved to be the most fun I’ve had and the most tranquil I’ve felt since leaving home in August. If you’re looking for a weekend getaway, Al Hoceima has definitely got you covered.

kayaking_alhoceima_morocco_jordanerb_photo1 A friend and I rented sea kayaks to explore the cliffs and caves surrounding Al Hociema and we were not disappointed!

cliffs_alhoceima_morocco_jordanerb_photo2

#2 Hercules Cave:

Tucked away amongst seaside cliffs near Tangier, the Hercules Cave is an underground opening to the sea that is said to have been created by a Greek god. Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, the entrance to the cave is shaped in a way that inspired its name, “The Map of Africa”.

herculescave_tangier_morocco_jordanerb_photo3Hercules cave can be a fun destination outside of the city and has a great view to offer.

silhouettes_tangier_morocco_jordanerb_photo4 A few of my classmates casting silhouettes in front of the Atlantic Ocean

#3 Jemma al Fnaa:

Jemma al Fnaa, part of the most famous medina in Morocco, is a must for both cultural immersion and satisfying touristic needs. It is in the center of a teeming maze of rug, pottery and metalwork vendors. As well as, the olive, date, and spice stands that are around every corner. Wandering the aisles and experiencing the bustling market scene offers an experience that is reminiscent of the traditional Morocco. For the sake of tourism, there are snake charmers, men in traditional Berber clothing and tamed monkeys available for photo opportunities.

jemaaalfna_marrakesh_morocco_jordanerb_photo5 While I held a snake, a group of men played flutes and “charmed” it

#4 Bahia Palace:

Located just meters away from Jemma al Fnaa, Bahia Palace is an awe-inspiring destination for history buffs. Created in the mid 1800s, the palace is made up of several houses, gardens, riyadhs and courtyards. Once serving as a home for royalty, the palace is adorned with intricate mosaics and beautiful foliage. It can now be explored for only 10 MAD, the equivalent of $1.

bahiapalace_marrakesh_morocco_jordanerb_photo7Just a small peak into one of the many beautiful courtyards in Bahia Palace

#5 Hassan II Mosque:

Located in Casablanca and boasting the world’s tallest minaret, Hassan II Mosque is Morocco’s crown jewel. It has the capacity to host over 100,000 worshippers and is one of the only mosques in the nation that permits the entrance of non-Muslims, who can tour the structure for about 100 MAD ($10). With the interior composed largely of marble, the mosque really is an architectural wonder and definitely worth a visit.

hassaniimosque_casablanca_morocco_jordanerb_photo8Marble pillars and enormous chandeliers are scattered throughout the mosque

The world awaits…discover it.

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