Discoveries

ISA Galway by the Numbers

Amanda Luce is a student at Saint Leo University and is an ISA Featured Photo Blogger. She is studying abroad with ISA in Galway, Ireland

I have always been fascinated by the amount of information that numbers can provide. Being focused academically on mathematics and economics, certain aspects of new places and travelling stand out to me. Living in Galway as a Study Abroad student has been a great experience so far, and some key features can help define this for anyone that wants to know what it is like.

New travel buddies: 4

Within the first week of making new friends in the ISA program, we were planning weekend trips around Ireland and even to other Countries in Europe. Flights here are way cheaper than at home, and splitting costs with friends makes staying places even more affordable. Our first stop was London, and a few more are in the works!

New appliances to learn: 8

Honestly I expected many things to be different here, causing an adjustment to the way I live. However, I did not expect to have trouble working a sink. A few other things that seemed confusing at first were the water heater, washing machine, and oven. Turns out, thanks to the help of Google, the oven only has a temperature knob and an on knob! Looking back, it’s comical thinking how simple the appliances are and that I have just been used to having things work a certain way at home.

Aran Islands: 3

Our program provided an excursion to the main Island of Inishmore. The views and simple way of living on this Island were fascinating. There are many historic landmarks to learn about, many being made of the stones that used to completely cover the island. There’s even a prehistoric fort to hike up to, with incredible views of the cliffs.

Times I’ve felt welcomed: Countless

The people of Galway are some of the friendliest and happiest people I have ever met. They use phrases like “Cheers!” and “Thanks a mil!” as common gestures. My favorite phrase that I have heard and seen all around is “céad míle fáilte” which means “A hundred thousand welcomes”. It’s hard to feel like a foreigner in a place so welcoming.

Your Discovery. Our People… The World Awaits.

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